Tag Archives: celiac

Grainless Pumpkin Bread

Pie pumpkins (aka sugar pumpkins – the small ones) recently went on sale for a dollar apiece at Kroger, so I grabbed one on a whim and decided I’d figure out something warm and autumnal to do with it later. Last night was “later” and the end result was a moist, delicious, you’d-never-know-it’s-grain-free pumpkin bread (honestly I can’t believe how moist it turned out). Perfect with chili, stew, or as a grain-free dish to pass at Thanksgiving.

You could use canned pumpkin for this bread if you wish. I used one small pie pumpkin, which yielded just the right amount of flesh for the recipe. I did not squeeze the liquid out of the flesh. I did stick it in a bowl in the fridge for about a day, simply because I got sidetracked by something else and had to postpone making the bread, I don’t think this affected it much though.

I loosely adapted this recipe based on a grain-free pumpkin bread recipe from Wellness Mama. I have a coconut-sensitive child so I have to adjust recipes calling for coconut flour, and I’m very happy with how this one turned out. As a bonus, bean flour is considerably cheaper than coconut flour. I’m also eager to try this bread with bananas instead of pumpkin.

Grainless Pumpkin Bread

1-1 ½ cups pumpkin (fresh or canned)

4 eggs

¼ cup olive oil, coconut oil, or softened butter

½ cup garbanzo bean flour (or coconut or other flour of your choice)

¼ cup ground almond/almond flour

½ cup brown sugar (or ¼ cup honey)

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 Tablespoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon nutmeg

1-2 Tablespoons milk, added a little at a time

Preheat oven to 400 and butter an 8×8” pan or a muffin tin

If you are using fresh pumpkin, cut the pumpkin in half, scoop out the guts, poke holes in it, and place flesh-side down on a microwave safe dish. Microwave for ten minutes. Alternately, place on an oven-safe dish and bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes or until fork tender. Allow to cool then scrape the pumpkin flesh off the skin. Use a potato masher or food processor to mash the flesh.

Add all ingredients except milk to the pumpkin and mix well. Batter should be thick and not runny, but pourable. Add the milk slowly so that you don’t overthin the batter. Pour into pan or muffin tin and bake 20-25 minutes for bread, and 13-15 minutes for muffins. Bread is done when it’s springy and no longer wet on top. Allow to cool for a few minutes before cutting.

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Grain-Free Pizza Crust

I can honestly say the only food I truly miss since going grain free is pizza. Oh pizza, how I loved you. Your hot, melty, cheesy goodness filling my mouth with an explosion of familiar, comforting yumminess. The ease of laying you out in front of the whole family and hearing no one say “ewww”. The excruciating pain you put me in that night I ended up in the ER…oh…wait, yeah, that’s why I stopped eating you….

I was so disappointed I couldn’t have pizza anymore. But then – THEN I read about a wonderful thing: grain-free pizza! The heavens parted, the angels sang, and I rolled up my sleeves.

The first recipe I tried was a cauliflower pizza crust, with minor success. It was yummy, but couldn’t be picked up in the hand like a regular piece of pizza (granted, this was likely due to my ineptitude at making it). The gluten-free kid and I ate it but the other kids wouldn’t touch it.

In my quest for a more “pizza-like” experience, I decided to modify an existing recipe from the book Internal Bliss. The original recipe calls for hazelnut flour, which is $13/lb. at my local Whole Foods, thus defeating the idea of eating grain free on a budget for regular people. Instead I used garbanzo bean flour, a veritable bargain at $3/lb. (recipe below).

garbanzobeancrust1

The result was surprisingly good. It was crispy, slightly nutty, and could be held in the hand like normal pizza. Even my extremely picky teenage boy liked it, and this child thinks everything other than Hot Pockets and ramen noodles “tastes weird”.

I do think next time I will substitute a little ground almond for part of the bean flour, just to mitigate the strong flavor a bit and lighten up the texture of the pizza crust. If you don’t have a coconut-sensitive person in the house as I do, you could try part coconut flour instead (and let me know how it works out!).

Obviously this grain-free pizza crust will not work for those on a paleo or low-carb diet. I use beans sparingly, but don’t mind having them for a once-in-a-while treat like pizza.

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Grain-Free Garbanzo Bean Pizza Crust

2 cups garbanzo bean (chick pea) flour (I used Bob’s Red Mill)

2 large eggs

1 Tbsp. olive oil (or oil of your choice)

1/2 tsp. sea salt

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/2 cup water, give or take

a handful ground almonds or almond flour (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 and generously grease a pizza pan or sheet tray. Combine the bean flour, eggs, oil, garlic powder, and salt. Add the water a drizzle at a time until the dough comes together, forming a sticky ball. Sprinkle the ground almond onto the pan (it acts just like cornmeal, creating a stick-free surface for the pizza crust). Use your fingers to press the dough ball into the desired shape, working from the center of the pizza dough outward. This recipe makes about a 12″ crust. Bake for 5-8 minutes (longer if you want it crispier), add sauce, cheese, and toppings and bake for a few more minutes until toppings are hot and cheese is melted.

Do you have a favorite grain-free pizza crust? Please share links and ideas in the comments!

Grain-Free Chicken Soup & Dessert

chickensoup

One of my new favorite grain-free meals is homemade chicken soup – perfect for the ever-cooler days! The kids and I often slow roast a whole chicken in the oven just to eat off of, so after cleaning all the meat off the next day I just drop the carcass in a couple quarts of water with a cut up onion, carrots, and celery, plus sea salt and pepper, and boil for a few hours (then allow to cool and strain, obvee).

The flavor in the resulting stock is amazing, but if you don’t have time to do this (and there were many years when I had babies in diapers and didn’t have time to bathe myself much less make homemade stock!) you can certainly use store-bought.

You can either freeze or refrigerate the stock, then when ready to assemble the soup:

  • saute a chopped onion in butter or olive oil – when it’s just about soft and ready, add a bit of chopped garlic (I use precut in a huge jar from Costco)
  • slice carrots, zucchini, and celery – the trick to this being a *souper* fast soup is to use a mandolin or the slicing side of a cheese grater; this makes the carrots thin so they cook lightning fast (plus they then resemble the texture of noodles a bit)
  • let the veggies simmer in the stock for a few minutes before adding the chicken, so that they have a chance to soften up a bit
  • add the chopped chicken and any additional seasoning – I throw in a few bay leaves and taste at this point to see if more salt and pepper are needed
  • simmer for 20-30 minutes to let the flavors join – then enjoy!

I also sometimes add a can of diced tomatoes, and next time I’m going to toss in a can of white beans for additional protein and bulk.

Add the sides of your choice for a satisfying meal – a salad, potatoes in some form, a lovely winter squash, grain-free muffins, the possibilities are limitless.

pbchchbars

Next I tried these flourless peanut butter chocolate chip blondies from The Detoxinista. The batter is insanely simple to put together. As promised when I started this blog, you’re getting pictures of my real unfancy food from my real unfancy kitchen, and that includes the (too frequent) times that I overcook things. My kids have have a long history of exclaiming “Mom! You didn’t burn it!” when I set before them a meal that isn’t dry with a suspiciously dark hue.

So here is what happens when you overcook these bars. If they look like mine, you left them in too long. I did mine about 20 minutes; I think next time I’ll set the timer to check them at 15 minutes. Still, they were delicious – with a cakey, caramel-ish taste – and even the grain-eating little trolls in my house kept stealing them when my back was turned.

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So, we have a keeper with these (especially if I don’t burn them again), for those occasional times that I miss the decadence of a dessert bar (I don’t do rich sugary things too much anymore, lest my body get any ideas about jumping back on the cravey-train). The next project is attempting to convert them to chocolate, as my 18 year old tells me “blonde brownies are always such a huge disappointment”. LOL. I will update on the results of those efforts.

Share your sinfully indulgent grain-free dessert ideas in the comments!

Getting to Grain Free

Not interested in weighing each chia seed that passes your lips? Me neither. So over photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/averagejane/counting every carb, calorie, and gram of sugar? Me too.

Trends among foodies and fitness buffs can be dizzying and overwhelming. One minute it’s cool to go into ketosis, the next we’re eating like cavemen. Even the non-diet diets – i.e. “lifestyle changes” – can be mind-numbing to real people who don’t have the time or resources to maintain a field full of organic goats and dandelion greens.

If you hang out online long enough, particularly among hippies and natural living type folk, it’s almost impossible not to be exposed to the concept that grains aren’t all they’re cracked up to be for human consumption. Given my own blood sugar challenges while riding the bread coaster, the logic of this wasn’t lost on me. Besides, I’m all in on doing the polar opposite of what the government says I should (cough – Monsanto and the FDA – cough).

USDA_Food_PyramidWHOFoodGuidelinesSummaryPyramid

Before I jump into my reasons for eliminating grains, let me start with full disclosure:

What this blog is:

  • a running account of my everyday journey without grains, including peripheral topics like exercise and general eating habits
  • a place where I will share photos of my visually-imperfect food creations from my mega-vintage (and not in a cool way), regular old semi-sloppy kitchen on my very modest (often paper) dishware
  • a place where I will share my ideas for reasonably healthy food choices that won’t drive you crazy with hard to find ingredients and complex preparation
  • a place for you to share your grain-free eating ideas with me and everyone else

What this blog isn’t:

  • a failsafe guide for gluten intolerant or celiac individuals
  • a paleo diet plan, a low-carb diet plan, a no-sugar diet plan, an all-organic from farms that only grow wheatgrass fertilized with rainbows and unicorn poop diet plan, you get the idea
  • a blog full of fancy, super-clean food porn pictures that look like they came from Food Network

On to the “why”…

One of my daughters has been gluten-free for several months due to severe stomach pain and bloating when she eats wheat. I sort of gradually followed in her footsteps because I feel sluggish when I eat bready food, and a lot of what we were making with the gluten-free baking mixes was actually pretty good.

grainfreeiconAs I read a little more into the potential harms of grains in general, particularly the links between wheat and diabetes and thyroid problems (diabetes runs rampant in my family and I’m already hypothyroid), the idea of giving them up completely grew on me. Concurrently, I’d been experiencing some problems that made going grain free an even more obvious choice.

I’d been having stomach pains late at night for a few weeks. One evening after having a couple slices of frozen store-bought pizza, I had a severe episode, worse than any so far. It felt like I was being stabbed repeatedly in the upper abdomen while someone tightened a giant belt ` around my entire ribcage allll the way around from back to front.

My friendly neighborhood ER gave me some wonderful, wonderful IV morphine and did an ultrasound. They decided I had gallstones and probably gallbladder sludge (doesn’t that sound delish? Makes ya wanna gobble up a big tub of lard, no?).

Backtrack a couple months prior to this attack – I had gone through the horrifying breakup of my long-term relationship. Every woman who’s ever been through it knows what that means. Break out the carbs! And the wine, and the chocolate…and….nothing says “You’ll never have another boyfriend again, fatty!” like crying in the fetal position for weeks with nothing but a full refrigerator and your unwashed hair to console you.

Sooo, once that mammoth gallbladder attack flattened me for two days with a bottle full of Tylenol 3 and regret, I decided I had nothing to lose by getting rid of the rest of the grains.

Now, if you’ve done any browsing of the interwebz trying to find out about this way of eating, you’re probably on information overload. There IS a middle ground, I promise. You don’t have to subsist on sprouts and dehydrated berries or shop exclusively at Whole Foods (unless you want to go totally organic, in which case, go for it!).

Honestly, one of the biggest difficulties is simply explaining to others that you don’t eat any grains, yes there’s a good reason, and no you’re not nuts (you just eat a lot of them!).

Eating to live (as opposed to living to eat) can be simple, believe it or not. I’m still deep in the learning curve though, so don’t take my word for it. Wait, sort of take my word for it, and follow along so we can learn together!

Please share your grain-free tips, experiences, and thoughts in the comments!